When I work with clay, it has my full attention. My mind is thinking about the aesthetics of the piece, mostly in terms of its proportions, fluidity, and its gestures. I am also curious about the interaction between the user and the piece based on how I place the handle, curve the rim, and treat the foot. There is a more intimate relationship between the mug you drink you tea/coffee out of than most of us think about. How your lips feel when you place them on the rim of your favorite cup, and how various forms of mugs invite your hand to hold it - these are all part of the intentional (or sometimes unintentional) designs of the maker, and things I think about when make work.

Among all the ways to fire ceramics, I am most drawn to the process, the rustic beauty, and the unpredictability of atmospheric firings. There's nothing like opening a kiln and seeing the results from these labor intensive, but exciting firings. You can see two of the firing processes I do here.

I have a background in music education and arts administration. I have always believed that art brings people together from all walks of life. And through working with art, whether it is teaching, in administration, or my ceramics work, I try to make meaningful connections with others around me, sharing this common love for art. Being based in New York, you will likely find me teaching adult wheel throwing and clay modeling with kids, or getting muddy in my studio, making bowls, mugs, or little animal rattles that make me smile. I'm also working on a body of sculptural work. 

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Loading a Noborigama salt kiln at Peters Valley School of Craft.

Photo credit: @sophiekyoon.ceramics